Imagine this: In the next 24 hours, you will become a master of MLM prospecting and have the answers to all the objections your MLM prospects will possibly ask.

Can you imagine how easy your MLM Prospecting will have become?

I’m gonna show you an easy method to quickly and professionally answer one of the most intimidating objections your MLM prospects will raise when you’re recruiting.

Answering The “How Much Money Are You Making?” MLM Objection.

Why Do Most MLM Propects Ask This Question?

Before I actually give you the MLM prospecting secret to handling this common objection, it’s important that we first dive into the mind of your prospect.

Why Will Your MLM Prospect Have This Objection?

  1. They’re using your income as an estimate of how much they’re gonna make if they join you in MLM.
  2. They’re actually trying to find a reason NOT to join you.

Weird, isn’t it?

Let me explain this by giving you 3 scenarios.

Propecting Scenario 1:

Prospect: So Dave, how much money are you making?

Dave: About $10, 000 a month.

Prospect: Wow, man you’re lucky! I probably can’t get the same results as you do. Sales is not my cup of tea.

Propecting Scenario 2:

Prospect: So Dave, how much money are you making?

Dave: Not bad, about $400 a month, but it will increase as I get more customers, referrals and downlines, yada yada yada…

Prospect: Hah! Told you, can’t make a lot of money from MLM.

Propecting Scenario 3:

Prospect: So Dave, how much money are you making?

Dave: $5000 a month.

Prospect: That’s all you’re making after 3 years?! That’s no different from my JOB!

The Key To Answering The MLM Income Objection Has Nothing To Do With Revealing Your Earnings

As you can see, being good at MLM prospecting and winning your prospects over has got nothing to do with telling them how much you make. Doesn’t matter if its $200, or $2000, or $20 000.

In fact, by revealing exactly how much you’ve made, you’re setting yourself up for failure.

I mean, seriously. It’s not that hard to imagine real life situations of people joining top earners in MLM but still don’t make a single cent, and also people that joined under unproductive uplines, but eventually surpassing them to become top earners.

The reason is simple.

How Much Money Your Downlines Make Has NOTHING To Do With Your Income

Their income ONLY depends their productivity and willingness to take action.

Now, we’ve established that you shouldn’t tell your MLM prospects how much you make, and neither should you lie about your income.

How then, should you answer the “How Much Are You Making” question?

Simple.

Here are 2 MLM prospecting methods you can use:

Method #1. “It’s not about how much I make. It’s about what you’re gonna do.”

This approach directly addresses your prospect’s underlying objection without having to deal with the one he asked.

It also educates your prospect about the difference between working at a job and working for yourself.

I like this method because it throws the conversation back into the MLM prospect’s court.

This way, you can move on to his next question (objection) until he is ready to decide whether to join you or not.

Method #2. “I don’t know. I haven’t finished collecting it all yet.”

This approach is great for creating opportunities for your prospect to ask about the difference between active income and passive income.

By answering this way, your prospect understands that he can also be paid repeatedly for his initial effort of building an MLM downline and customer base.

Skyrocket Your Sponsoring By Changing Your MLM Prospecting

Simply by changing your approach and attitude while prospecting for MLM downlines, you can put an end to getting hung up on and start sponsoring more than ever. Prospects will actually thanking you for the conversations that you have.

Sponsoring and MLM prospecting doesn’t have to be hard, frustrating, or filled with rejection.

All you need to know is learn how to do it the right way, the fun way, from someone that knows how to do it and do it well.


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